Academic IELTS Reading: Test 1 Reading passage 3; To catch a king; with best solutions and explanations

This Academic IELTS Reading post focuses on solutions to an IELTS Reading Test 1 Reading Passage 3 titled ‘To catch a king’. This is a targeted post for IELTS candidates who have great problems finding out and understanding Reading Answers in the AC module. This post can guide you the best to understand every Reading answer quite easily. Finding out IELTS Reading answers is a gradual process, and this post will assist you in this respect.

Academic IELTS Reading Module: Test 1

Reading Passage 3: Questions 27-40

The headline of the passage: To catch a king

Questions 27-31: Completing summary with a list of words: 

[In this type of question, candidates are asked to complete a summary with a list of words taken from the passage. Candidates must write the correct letter (not the words) as the answers. Keywords and synonyms are important to find answers correctly. Generally, this type of question maintains a sequence. Find the keywords in the passage and you are most likely to find the answers.]

Title of the summary: The story behind the hunt for Charles II

Question no. 27: Charles Il’s father was executed by the Parliamentarian forces in 1649. Charles 11 then formed a __________ with the Scots, … .. . .. .. 

Keywords for the question: Charles Il’s father, executed by, Parliamentarian forces, 1649, formed, with the Scots, 

Let’s have a look at the first paragraph. Here, in lines 5-9, the writer of the passage says, “ . .. . .. . .. After his father was executed by the Parliamentarians in 1649, the young Charles II sacrificed one of the very principles his father had died for and did a deal with the Scots, . . . .. .. .” 

Here, did a deal = a strategic agreement with the Scots to become the King of Scots, 

So, the answer is: H (strategic alliance)

Question no. 28:  . .. . .. . . and in order to become King of Scots, he abandoned an important ___________ that was held by his father and had contributed to his father’s death. 

Keywords for the question: to become King of Scots, abandoned, important, held by his father, contributed, his father’s death,  

In the first paragraph, the writer says in lines 7-11, “ .. .. . .. . the young Charles II sacrificed one of the very principles his father had died for and did a deal with the Scots, thereby accepting Presbyterianism* as the national religion in return for being crowned King of Scots.. .. . . ..” 

Here, the young Charles II sacrificed one of the very principles his father had died for = he abandoned an important .. .. . … that was held by his father and had contributed to his father’s death,
in return for being crowned King of Scots = in order to become King of Scots,
Presbyterianism* as the national religion = religious conviction/belief, 

So, the answer is: J (religious conviction)

Question no. 29: The opposing sides then met outside Worcester in 1651. The battle led to a _____________ for the Parliamentarians and Charles had to flee for his life.

Keywords for the question: opposing sides, met outside Worcester, 1651, battle led to, for the Parliamentarians, Charles, had to flee,

In the first paragraph, take a close look at lines 15-21, “ . .. . .. The two sides finally faced one another at Worcester in the west of England in 1651. After being comprehensively defeated on the meadows outside the city by the Parliamentarian army, the 21-year-old king found himself the subject of a national manhunt, .. .. .. .” 

Here, The two sides finally faced one another at Worcester in the west of England in 1651 = The opposing sides then met outside Worcester in 1651,
comprehensively defeated = decisive victory,
the 21-year-old king found himself the subject of a national manhunt = Charles had to flee for his life, 

So, the answer is: F (decisive victory)

Question no. 30: A ____________ was offered for Charles’s capture, … .. . .. . .

Keywords for the question: was offered, for Charles’s capture, 

In paragraph no. 1, take a look at lines 17-22, “ . .. . .. . After being comprehensively defeated on the meadows outside the city by the Parliamentarian army, the 21-year-old king found himself the subject of a national manhunt, with a huge sum offered for his capture. . .. . . . ” 

Here, a huge sum offered = large reward, 

his capture = Charles’s capture,  

So, the answer is: B (large reward)

Question no. 31:  . . .. .. . .. but after six weeks spent in hiding, he eventually managed to reach the __________ of continental Europe.

Keywords for the question: but, after six weeks, spent in hiding, eventually, managed to reach, of continental Europe,   

In lines 22-26 of paragraph no. 1, the writer says, “ . .. . .. . . Over the following six weeks, he managed, through a series of heart-pounding close escapes, to evade the Parliamentarians before seeking refuge in France. .. .. . .” 

Here, seeking refuge in France = seeking relative safety of continental Europe,  

So, the answer is: D (relative safety)

Questions 32-35: YES, NO, NOT GIVEN:

In this type of question, candidates are asked to find out whether:

The statement in the question matches with the claim of the writer in the text- YES
The statement in the question contradicts the claim of the writer in the text- NO
The statement in the question has no clear connection with the account in the text- NOT GIVEN

[TIPS: For this type of question, you can divide each statement into three independent pieces and make your way through to the answer. This question type generally follows a sequence. So, scanning skill is effective here.] 

Question no. 32: Charles chose Pepys for the task because he considered him to be trustworthy.

Keywords for the question: chose Pepys, because, considered him, trustworthy,  

We can find out about Charles II’s discussion with Samuel Pepys about writing a paper on his escape from Britain in paragraph no. 2. However, there is no information regarding the reason behind choosing Pepys because of trustworthiness. 

So, the answer is: NOT GIVEN

Question no. 33: Charles’s personal recollection of the escape lacked sufficient detail.

Keywords for the question: Charles’s personal recollection, escape, lacked, sufficient detail,     

Take a look at lines 7-9 of paragraph no. 2, “ . . .. . Over two three-hour sittings, the king related to him in great detail his personal recollections of the six weeks he had spent as a fugitive. .. . .. .” 

Here, in great detail = did not lacked sufficient detail, 

The line contradicts the information in the question. 

So, the answer is: NO

Question no. 34: Charles indicated to Pepys that he had planned his escape before the battle.

Keywords for the question: Charles, indicated to Pepys, had planned, escape, before the battle,       

In paragraph no. 2, the writer says in lines 12-15, “ .. . . ..  Charles commenced his story: ‘After the battle was so absolutely lost as to be beyond hope of recovery, I began to think of the best way of saving myself.’  .. . . .” 

Here, After the battle was so absolutely lost = AFTER the battle, 

I began to think of the best way of saving myself = he had planned his escape, 

The line contradicts the information in the question. 

So, the answer is: NO

Question no. 35: The inclusion of Charles’s account is a positive aspect of the book.  

Keywords for the question: inclusion of Charles’s account, positive aspect,   

Let’s have a look at paragraph no. 3. Here, if we read lines 1-4, we can find the answer to the question. The writer says here, “One of the joys of Spencer’s book, a result not least of its use of Charles II’s own narrative as well as those of his supporters, is just how close the reader gets to the action. .. . . . .” 

Here, One of the joys of Spencer’s book = a positive aspect of the book, 

its use of Charles II’s own narrative = The inclusion of Charles’s account, 

The lines suggest that the readers can get the complete action when they hear from not only Charles II but also from his supporters. 

So, the answer is: YES

Questions 36-40: Multiple-choice questions 

[This type of question asks you to choose a suitable answer from the options using the knowledge you gained from the passage. This question type generally follows a sequence. So, scanning skill is effective here.]

Question no. 36: What is the reviewer’s main purpose in the first paragraph?

Keywords for the question: reviewer’s main purpose, first paragraph,   

In paragraph no. 1, the writer vividly describes what led Charles II to escape his own kingdom. We find the complete background story- his father’s death, sacrificing his father’s principle by making a deal with the Scots, English Parliamentary army invading Scotland, then Scottish invasion of England, defeat of the Scots at the battle of Worcester, and then his escape. 

So, the answer is: B (to give an account of the circumstances leading to Charles II’s escape)

Question no. 37: Why does the reviewer include examples of the fugitives’ behaviour in the third paragraph?

Keywords for the question: why, the reviewer include, examples, the fugitives’ behaviour, third paragraph,       

In the third paragraph, read the first few lines, “One of the joys of Spencer’s book, a result not least of its use of Charles II’s own narrative as well as those of his supporters, is just how close the reader gets to the action. The day-by­ day retelling of the fugitives’ doings provides delicious details: . . .. . . .”

Here, day-by­ day retelling of the fugitives’ doings = examples of the fugitives’ behaviour, 

delicious details & the reader gets to the action = illustrate how the events of the six weeks are brought to life, 

So, the answer is: C (to illustrate how the events of the six weeks are brought to life) 

Question no. 38: What point does the reviewer make about Charles II in the fourth paragraph?

Keywords for the question: point, the reviewer make, about Charles II, fourth paragraph, 

Lines 11-16 and the final lines of paragraph no. 4 gives us the answer to this question. In lines 11-16, the writer says, “ . .. . .. .. This makes it all the more interesting that Charles II himself loved the story so much ever after. As well as retelling it to anyone who would listen, causing eye­ rolling among courtiers, he set in train a series of initiatives to memorialize it. . . .. . .” 

Here, Charles II himself loved the story so much ever after = He chose to celebrate what was essentially a defeat, 

Then, in the final lines, the writer says again, “ . .. .  .. . . It is hard to imagine many other kings marking the lowest point in their life so enthusiastically, or indeed pulling off such an escape in the first place.” 

Here, marking the lowest point in their life so enthusiastically = He chose to celebrate what was essentially a defeat,

So, the answer is: A (He chose to celebrate what was essentially a defeat.)

Question no. 39: What does the reviewer say about Charles Spencer in the fifth paragraph? 

Keywords for the question: what, the reviewer say, about Charles Spencer, fifth paragraph,      

In paragraph no. 5, lines 3-10 say, “ . . . . He has even-handed sympathy for both the fugitive king and the fierce republican regime that hunted him, and he succeeds in his desire to explore far more of the background of the story than previous books on the subject have done.  . . …” 

Here, even-handed sympathy for both the fugitive king and the fierce republican regime = takes an unbiased approach to the subject matter, 

So, the answer is: B (He takes an unbiased approach to the subject matter.)

Question no. 40: When the reviewer says the book ‘doesn’t quite hit the mark’, she is making the point that

Keywords for the question: When the reviewer says the book ‘doesn’t quite hit the mark’, making the point, 

The answer can be found in paragraph no. 6 in the first half of the paragraph. The writer says here, “The tantalising question left, in the end, is that of what it all meant. Would Charles II have been a different king had these six weeks never happened? The days and nights spent in hiding must have affected him in some way. Did the need to assume disguises, to survive on wit and charm alone, to use trickery and subterfuge to escape from tight corners help form him? This is the one area where the book doesn’t quite hit the mark. . … .. .” 

Here, questions like “Would Charles II have been a different king had these six weeks never happened?” and “Did the need to assume disguises, to survive on wit and charm alone, to use trickery and subterfuge to escape from tight corners help form him?” suggest that the writer doesn’t find an answer to whether Charles II’s experiences had a lasting influence on him or not.

So, the answer is: D (it fails to address whether Charles II’s experiences had a lasting influence on him.)

Click here for solutions to Academic Test 1 Passage 1: The development of the London underground railway

Click here for solutions to Academic Test 1 Passage 2: Stadiums: past, present and future

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